Photo 22 Sep

(Source: vl4da)

Photo 22 Sep naturalhairdaily:

@miss_rizos loves embracing the frizz! That mega Fro is simply beautiful đź’›

naturalhairdaily:

@miss_rizos loves embracing the frizz! That mega Fro is simply beautiful đź’›

Video 20 Sep

Beautiful Engagement Session of Fadila and Farid

NIGERIA

Video 20 Sep

foliee-a-deuxx:

Where can I go 2c things like these?! Damn.

(Source: davidesky2)

Video 18 Sep

yagazieemezi:

Laurent Elie Badessi traveled to Niger, Africa in 1987 and 1988 to photograph indigenous tribes for his Master’s Degree thesis project entitled “Ethnological Fashion Photography”. His goal was to study the impact of photography on natives from different ethnical groups, some of who had never (or very rarely) been exposed to this medium. The psychological aspect in the interaction that occurs between a photographer and his sitter during a photo session was also a focal point in his research.

For this undertaking, Badessi adopted the method of “La photographie négociée” (the Negotiated Photography), introduced to him by his teacher photographer Michel Séméniako. Badessi was seduced by this method and decided to use it here, because it allows the sitter to determine most of the parameters for a photo session that captures his/her image. In this case: the pose, the clothes, the make-up, the accessories, the time of day and the location. To make these sittings playful, he decided to use an element specific to human kind—clothing—as the main source of interaction between him and the autochthones.

For his research to be pertinent, Badessi decided to stay extended periods of time with each different ethnicity to better appreciate their culture. He and his team lived with the following ethnicities all across the country: the Haoussas, the Bororo (Wodaabe), the Kanouris, the Gourmances, the Djemmas, the Beri Beris and the Touareg.

The experience with the Bororo happened to be one of the greatest highlights of the project. Because they worship beauty, this highly nomadic group was particularly drawn to the “magic” and playfulness of having their photo taken.

Photography was totally foreign to this group of Bororo. To familiarize them with the medium, Badessi started taking Polaroid of his teammates, so they could see and understand its process. Little by little they became more comfortable with the team and expressed an increasing curiosity towards the “magic box” known to us as the camera. This particular group of about 100 nomads had only seen their image as a reflection of themselves into the water or in the mirror. When Badessi took their photo on Polaroid, he had to explain what to look for on the image–their face, their hat, their accessories, et cetera. Appearing so small wasn’t rational to them. It was total magic, because they were used to see their reflection as a life-size image, but not as a “tiny person” on a small piece a paper! Once they were able to recognize themselves, they laughed and placed the Polaroid over their heart. It was very emotional to see how touched they were and how precious the Polaroid became to them.

The photo sessions were a success and they became an integral part of the Bororo’s daily routine. After the cores, they could not wait to get ready for the sittings.

As Badessi mentions in his thesis, “we were in symbiosis with them, as much as they were with us. They were excited to have visitors and to share these great moments together. It was very inspirational to look at them getting ready. Somehow it was a meditative experience for us, because they took their time, you did not feel the constant pressure of the clock ticking in the back of your head, like we do in our culture, especially in big megalopolises. They totally lived in harmony with Mother Nature and respected her rhythm.” (Keep reading)

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Photo 15 Sep prepaidafrica:

How a Ghanaian messaging app got acquired by a US-based tech firm
 At a technology event in Nairobi earlier this year Ghanaian entrepreneur Robert Lamptey wowed the audience as he narrated how his chat application Saya Mobile had gained millions of users in over 30 countries in just three years.
Founded in 2011, Saya is a replacement for text messaging much like WhatsApp, but built for feature phones, and has gained users globally including countries such as India, Syria, Indonesia and Bangladesh.
At the event Lamptey explained how the company’s servers crashed several times as the application went viral with 400,000 downloads in its first two months. Saya’s was the perfect story of a small African company scaling globally.
Last month Saya was acquired by US-headquartered Kirusa, a leader in voice messaging and social media mobile apps in emerging markets. Kirusa’s portfolio of mobile services include the InstaVoice, Celeb Connect and Sports Connect apps, which are offered in partnership with more than 35 mobile carriers in Africa, India, Latin America and Middle East.
Its services are used monthly by over 80m mobile users in four continents.

prepaidafrica:

How a Ghanaian messaging app got acquired by a US-based tech firm


At a technology event in Nairobi earlier this year Ghanaian entrepreneur Robert Lamptey wowed the audience as he narrated how his chat application Saya Mobile had gained millions of users in over 30 countries in just three years.

Founded in 2011, Saya is a replacement for text messaging much like WhatsApp, but built for feature phones, and has gained users globally including countries such as India, Syria, Indonesia and Bangladesh.

At the event Lamptey explained how the company’s servers crashed several times as the application went viral with 400,000 downloads in its first two months. Saya’s was the perfect story of a small African company scaling globally.

Last month Saya was acquired by US-headquartered Kirusa, a leader in voice messaging and social media mobile apps in emerging markets. Kirusa’s portfolio of mobile services include the InstaVoice, Celeb Connect and Sports Connect apps, which are offered in partnership with more than 35 mobile carriers in Africa, India, Latin America and Middle East.

Its services are used monthly by over 80m mobile users in four continents.

Video 14 Sep

foliee-a-deuxx:

Where can I go 2c things like these?! Damn.

(Source: davidesky2)

Photo 14 Sep
Video 14 Sep

yagazieemezi:

The YAGAZIE Lunch Series

I have been in Lagos for over five months now and it has not been without its challenges. Lagos is bursting at the seams with activity and life and I wanted to contribute to the bee hive. Ever since my YouTube and blogging days, I have eagerly awaited the opportunity to create a space for young African women to gather and freely talk. With this step, I hope to work towards creating a safe space for young women to discuss several issues revolving around mental health, sexuality, eating disorders and other personal and social issues.

Personal stories flew back and forth across the tables and I was a bit taken aback by the willingness to share. Success. Here in Nigeria, it is so common to hear the youth openly discuss politics, academics, pop culture, etc, but when the time comes to talk about personal issues such as mental health, sexuality, abuse, we hush up. We go behind close doors to talk softly while the majority of us choose not to talk at all. But these are issues that affect us as individuals. (Keep reading)

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Photo 14 Sep blackaroundtheworld:

#Tuareg women are known to make and wear some very beautiful #jewelry. Here are a few pieces (from top left):  •Tuareg pectoral pendant (Kel Agaggar #Algeria) #silver, #leather. Located at UCLA Fowler Museum in LA. •Tuareg Filigrel cross of #Agadez (#Fulbe, #Mali) #gold. Fowler Museum in LA •Saidi Tuareg necklace (Agadez, #Niger) silver, glass. Cantor Arts Center, Stanford, California •Tuareg Bracelet (El Hadj, Tchad) silver. National Museum of #AfricanArt, Washington DC #africanjewlery #fashioninspiration #culture #jewlerymaker #blackwoman

blackaroundtheworld:

#Tuareg women are known to make and wear some very beautiful #jewelry. Here are a few pieces (from top left):
•Tuareg pectoral pendant (Kel Agaggar #Algeria) #silver, #leather. Located at UCLA Fowler Museum in LA.
•Tuareg Filigrel cross of #Agadez (#Fulbe, #Mali) #gold. Fowler Museum in LA
•Saidi Tuareg necklace (Agadez, #Niger) silver, glass. Cantor Arts Center, Stanford, California
•Tuareg Bracelet (El Hadj, Tchad) silver. National Museum of #AfricanArt, Washington DC
#africanjewlery #fashioninspiration #culture #jewlerymaker #blackwoman


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